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16-03-2009

People look at other people’s faces.

In this video I showed that even my 11 month old son, Benjamin James Breeze, looks straight at faces shown to him in Facebook! It is habitual.

Did you know that the images of faces that capture people’s attention can be used to guide people around a website or an ad? I thought it was obvious! However, when I was representing Objective Digital at ad:tech Sydney 09 last week I mentioned it to people, and they were amazed! I realised it was worth posting about it!

Here’s a little experiment with 106 people that I’ve demonstrated the Tobii T60 eye tracker to over the last month or so.

The image below is a sample gaze path of one person looking at a baby in a product ad:

Tobii eye tracker gaze path on baby face advert

The blobs are where the person has fixated on the image. You’ll notice the person starts looking in the middle of the page (we planned it that way by using a fixation cross between each stimuli)  and then goes straight to the baby face.  He focusses on it a few times then moves his attention over to the text by his 7th fixation.

And here’s an image of that same baby looking up and toward the main content heading. Notice the person fixates less on the baby’s face and then he quickly looks straight over to the text at the 5th fixation.

One person you say?

Well, here’s a combined heat map of 106 people looking at the first image. The redder the spot, the more time people looked at it.

There is heaps of focus on the baby’s face and relatively little on the text.

Here’s the same 106 people looking at the second image for  the same amount of time (The images were shown in a to everyone in a random order on Tobii Studio software running with a Tobii T60 eye tracker).

Notice how many more people are actually reading the text that the baby is looking at in the above image? Not to mention the increased attention on the brand!

In advertising we will look at what the person we see in an ad is looking at.  If they are looking out at us we will simply look back at them and not really anywhere else.

Faces can be used to guide a person’s attention to key content and make sure they actually read it.

What are you looking at?

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136 Responses

  1. Hi James

    I couldn’t agree more with you. I have seen the same thing in the past (see here: http://blobfisk.com/initial-takeway-findings-from-eye-tracking/). We’ve used these results to influence our image strategy and as information for advertisers.

    I would add another thing about faces, and that is recall. I’ve mixed eye tracking with some task based testing in the past, and one of the things that flagged up is that people recall ads with faces far, far more than any other type of advert.

    So, faces mean that not only will the chance of users seeing your ad go up, so will the recall of your ad/brand.

  2. Thanks to @BrettSinclair for your tweet and link to Bunnyfoot - Eye tracking Results - “You look where they look” http://budurl.com/x5pf - That confirms the BunnyFoot study http://budurl.com/b97y

  3. I wonder how this relates to what has been termed “engagement”? I would guess from my own thoughts and feelings that others might get more of an emotional feeling from the piece with the baby looking directly at them (at least I did). Could this test possibly also demonstrate or suggest some sort of a separation between cognitive (they read more content-baby facing content) and emotional (looked at the face facing foward longer) engagement? I wonder which ad would perform better with a recall test? I.e. if there is a difference in emotional and cognitive engagelment, which would be recalled better? Just curious!

  4. Thanks and Hi Nick!
    I reckon there needs to be a little more research on this! Perhaps there is some out there already. I need to have a look ;) Anyone seen any?
    JB

  5. fsfddd 11/05/09
  6. :razz: :roll: :grin: :idea:

  7. This is totally awesome. It should have been so obvious - but at the same time completely stupid because of course the face isn’t really looking at anything at all. Its just a picture! In our relaxed, private minds though we just go with the idea that it IS looking at something. This is great psychology. I’m wondering now what other sorts of images would have an influence, like traffic moving in one direction, or arrows? Birds flying in a certain direction? Wow! This is great!

  8. thanks, glad you enjoyed it

  9. Interesting study James, i wonder if this would be the case if the layout in the example was different, if say, the headline was much larger. This example only proves the “Rule of thirds” .

  10. These findings have been around for some while but this is one of the best article about it. It’s straight to the point.

    Now the problem is how to elegantly integrate any human face into a site design. It’s easy to just put a picture there but not so to make it unobtrusive.

  11. Wow that’s really interesting. I didn’t even know there was such thing as an eye-tracker. :shock:

  12. Thanks Yang! I hope to do some more tracking on faces and develop the theory.

  13. wow so interesting

  14. It’s useful for me. Thanks for your article.

  15. Thanks for posting this. Very interesting. I have a question though: why only 106 people? I work with sites that receive millions of uniques a month and 106 people doesn’t even come close to the number of people who do not have Flash install, or javascript turned on, or are visually impaired.

  16. Hi Jason,
    It’s simply research and each person has to be tested individually, face-to-face.
    106 is way more than enough to produce a statistically significant effect. Meaning that the results can be generalized across the population of users looking at faces.
    Hope this helps.
    James

  17. pooja 29/09/09
  18. Gudone and new tooooo :shock:

  19. Great post and a very elegant study, James! I described your findings in my post here: http://www.neurosciencemarketing.com/blog/articles/baby-heat-maps.htm

    Roger

  20. Why thank you!

  21. Hi again James. I appreciate your reply, but your answer doesn’t really help me. Producing a statistical effect is, to me, like saying “I made a book because it has a cover and pages within”. Can you give us more detail of the study: 1) How were people selected 2) What were their genders 3) What was their cultural background 5) Ages 6) Were they given an eye exam before the eye tracking test 7) If so, what were their results 8) Did any of them have physical disabilities 9) What operating system were they using during the time of the test 10) what browser 11) what screen resolution 12) What is the average number of hours these people spend on the net (are they power users or skimmers).

    What you’ve given us here is only the essence of the study, which is great, but what I’m learning here, I feel, is very biased and I still feel very ignorant of critical information that I could find useful for creating web sites.

    Thanks for your time.

  22. James, thanks for this post. I remember many years ago having a similiar realization about how very young kittens would look directly at my face…even as I towered over them. They had that same relational desire - they wanted to be fed and knew that the big person was the source of that yet they also knew I had a face to appeal to! (rather than just rubbing up against my legs). Fascinating stuff.

  23. LOL! We have (very seriously for a client) tried to track dogs with a tracker but their eyes are on the side of their head and it doesn’t work. Although you can track apes http://bit.ly/1UtZnO Would a cat sit still long enough to try?! Mm. Maybe not… I’d get too much hayfever to be bothered!
    Thanks!!

  24. Great article! Thanks for sharing. I’m interested to see how this will influence my designs in the future.

  25. I remember a well-known offline marketer saying that when he had his picture looking away from his text, not only did his ad not work as well - but the adjacent ad that he was ‘looking at’ did much better!

  26. WOW, that was some great tips to use on some of my sites. I will definitely be using some of these techniques.
    Thanks a lot!

  27. That’s very interesting and valuable! thanks for sharing

  28. James,

    Thanks for the post. I could not agree with you more. I wrote about the same thing a while back on my blog: http://wp.me/pwfa1-mN. With a little bit of thought and effort, people can really raise their game when it comes to presentations. For a fascinating look at the psychology related to this topic, you should look at this great article by Les Posen: http://lesposen.wordpress.com/2009/11/15/faces/.

    All the best for 2010!

    John Zimmer

  29. yup, the knowledge of heatmaps would help marketers in their decisions. i just want to emphasize the need for balance in the overall design of a web

  30. Great post and look interesting

  31. :wink: I think that’s an effective tip when it comes to advertising.

  32. For people who aren’t familiar with heatmaps: what you see is the result of eyetracking research that follows the eye gaze of people. monster beats proThe red zones indicate areas that were looked at by 80 to 100% of people. In this case, the research was done with 106 people by the Australian UsableWorld.Monster Pro Kopfhörer Schwarz

  33. This is generally a wonderful website i should say,I enjoyed reading your articles. This is truly a great read for me. I have bookmarked it and I am looking forward to reading new articles. Keep up the good work

  34. Nice post. I have been instructing my clients about this for last 10 years, but nobody wants to believe unless is proven by testing :)

  35. Awesome research. Will definitely remember this for future projects.

  36. Shmuel Bollen 14/02/12
  37. Hi,
    Neat study, although I am curious regarding your statement that 106 participants constitutes a statistically-significant result that can be generalized across the internet-using population. Wouldn’t you need to need to look at the percentage of people within your study that looked at the baby first and then looked at the headline vs. those that looked at the headline first, or did not look at the headline? You could then take that percentage, let’s say that it is 75%, and compute a confidence interval. In this case, it would be 8.24. You would then need to test with a genuinely random sample size of 141 people. Between 66.76% and 83.24% of the testers would actually look first at the baby and then at the headline 95% of the time. If the sample size is not made up of truly random people, then you could not even rely on that confidence interval, in other words it may be much wider.
    I would check into it…the heatmaps are really interesting, but would be far more compelling with some statistical analysis.
    Best,
    Shmuel

  38. Yes indeed Shmuel, I agree but we didn’t do that at the time.

  39. ITs truly amazing, have we got any updates on this ? Most of this is Subconscious. Thanks for the post James

  1. (via Pingback)

    15/04/09

  2. [...] Breeze, James. You look where they look | UsableWorld - James Breeze’s Blog. 3/16/2009 [cited 4/9/2009 2009]. Available from http://usableworld.com.au/2009/03/16/you-look-where-they-look/. [...]

  3. (via Pingback)

    23/07/09

  4. [...] your message across in your artwork? 9 07 2009 I found this study into faces in images on James Breeze’s Usable World Blog really interesting, and maybe quite surprising. Using eye-tracking software he has shown how image [...]

  5. (via Pingback)

    24/09/09

  6. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

  7. (via Pingback)

    24/09/09

  8. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

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    24/09/09

  10. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

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  12. [...] Publicado em 24/09/2009 por Woody Uma leitura rápida e curiosa sobre Eye Tracking e um vídeo que complementa o [...]

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    25/09/09

  14. [...] image is looking in. eye tracking Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. eye tracking And now the baby is looking at the content. Notice the increase in people looking at [...]

  15. (via Pingback)

    25/09/09

  16. [...] The list includes some interesting psychological research results like the fact that people look at images of other people’s faces – and then whatever those faces are pointing at. [...]

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    25/09/09

  18. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

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  20. [...] Bilder mit Menschen verwenden Die Besucher fokussieren ihre Wahrnehmung auf Gesichter und deren Augenpartie auch sehr interessant die Studie You look where they look. [...]

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  25. [...] You Look Where The Look – UsableWorld.com.au [...]

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  27. [...] Tracking: Usability Market Research, Website Usability and Product Research og You look where they look | UsableWorld by @jamesbreeze og ad:tech Sydney - The Event For Digital Marketing! Tweet This!Subscribe to the comments for this [...]

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  29. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

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  33. [...] making eye contact with your site.  Here’s proof from a recent heatmap study provided by UsableWorld study.  Here are some thoughts from a recent article in Smashing Magazine on this same topic: [...]

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  35. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

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  37. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

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  39. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

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  41. [...] 一个正在看我们的小孩儿的图片的眼动跟踪热图,来自于UsableWorld的研究。 [...]

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  43. [...] Los usuarios prestan atención a las caras que se ven en pantalla. Fuente: You look where they look [...]

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  45. [...] Los usuarios prestan atención a las caras que se ven en pantalla. Fuente: You look where they look [...]

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  47. [...] and Guidelines» приводится ссылка на очень интересное исследование, результаты которого все мы знаем в обыденной жизни, [...]

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  49. [...] который смотрит прямо на нас. Исследование сделано Usable World. Тепловая карта - [...]

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  51. [...] 一个正在看我们的小孩儿的图片的眼动跟踪热图,来自于UsableWorld的研究。 [...]

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  53. [...] Тепловая карта отслеживания взора при просмотре изображения с ребенком, который смотрит прямо на нас. Исследование сделано Usable World. [...]

  54. (via Pingback)

    29/09/09

  55. [...] specialist James Breeze conducted a study of how people view baby ads with 106 subjects (You Look Where They Look.). He used eye-tracking technology to measure the direction and duration of the subjects’ eye [...]

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    30/09/09

  57. [...] Sáng nay vừa đọc được một bài viết khá thú vị về đề tài thiết kế giao diện người dùng và độ khả dụng (User Interface Design and Usability) của James Breeze với tựa đề là “You look where they look“. [...]

  58. (via Pingback)

    30/09/09

  59. [...] est que lorsque le visage regarde une zone, l’internaute va naturellement y jeter un oeil (l’article). Regardez plutôt, [...]

  60. (via Pingback)

    01/10/09

  61. [...] está o estudo eye-tracking que demonstra isso. Estamos instintivamente atraídos para rostos, mas se esse cara está [...]

  62. (via Pingback)

    01/10/09

  63. [...] James Breeze, web usability expert, has recently completed a study demonstrating that people instinctively notice when other people come into view. (You can check out the study on Breeze’s website, UsableWorld. [...]

  64. (via Pingback)

    03/10/09

  65. [...] 一个正在看我们的小孩儿的图片的眼动跟踪热图,来自于UsableWorld的研究。 [...]

  66. (via Pingback)

    05/10/09

  67. [...] Los usuarios prestan atención a las caras que se ven en pantalla. Fuente: You look where they look [...]

  68. (via Pingback)

    10/10/09

  69. [...] person in the image is looking in. Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. And now the baby is looking at the content. Notice the increase in people looking at the headline [...]

  70. (via Pingback)

    10/10/09

  71. [...] image is looking in. eye tracking Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. eye tracking And now the baby is looking at the content. Notice the increase in people looking at [...]

  72. (via Pingback)

    12/10/09

  73. [...] image is looking in. eye tracking Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. eye tracking And now the baby is looking at the content. Notice the increase in people looking at [...]

  74. (via Pingback)

    12/10/09

  75. [...] and Guidelines» приводится ссылка на очень интересное исследование, результаты которого все мы знаем в обыденной жизни, [...]

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    13/10/09

  77. [...] 一个正在看我们的小孩儿的图片的眼动跟踪热图,来自于UsableWorld的研究。 [...]

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  79. [...] very interesting study over at UsableWorld illustrates how images used in articles that have faces can have unusual effects on what people [...]

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  81. [...] Los usuarios prestan atención a las caras que se ven en pantalla. Fuente: You look where they look [...]

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  83. [...] 一个正在看我们的小孩儿的图片的眼动跟踪热图,来自于UsableWorld的研究。 [...]

  84. (via Pingback)

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  85. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

  86. (via Pingback)

    21/10/09

  87. [...] une étude de suivi du regard qui démontre ça. Nous sommes instinctivement attirés par les visages, mais si ce visage regarde [...]

  88. (via Pingback)

    31/10/09

  89. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study . Eye-Tracking mapa de calor de un bebé que mira directamente a nosotros, desde el estudio UsableWorld. [...]

  90. (via Pingback)

    13/11/09

  91. [...] a qual os olhos numa imagem estão apontando, influenciam como vamos ler determinado conteúdo (fonte) [...]

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  93. [...] Los usuarios prestan atención a las caras que se ven en pantalla. Fuente: You look where they look [...]

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    16/11/09

  95. [...] Reader Alexander Fell has kindly located the source of these most interesting screenshots: http://usableworld.com.au/2009/03/16/you-look-where-they-look/ The author is James Breeze, a website useability [...]

  96. (via Pingback)

    18/11/09

  97. [...] Mapa de calor sobre la trayectoria del ojo de un bebe mirando directamente hacia nosotros, de UsableWorld study. [...]

  98. (via Pingback)

    18/11/09

  99. [...] Mapa de calor sobre la trayectoria del ojo de un bebe mirando directamente hacia nosotros, de UsableWorld study. [...]

  100. (via Pingback)

    09/12/09

  101. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

  102. (via Pingback)

    18/12/09

  103. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

  104. (via Pingback)

    07/01/10

  105. [...] For people who aren’t familiar with heatmaps: what you see is the result of eyetracking research that follows the eye gaze of people. The red zones indicate areas that were looked at by 80 to 100% of people. In this case, the research was done with 106 people by the Australian UsableWorld. [...]

  106. (via Pingback)

    13/02/10

  107. [...] von Botschaft und Handlungsaufforderung der E-Mail unbeabsichtigt weglenken und absorbieren – diese und diese Eyetracking-Studien zeigen dies sehr eindrucksvoll auf. Im vorliegenden Beispiel ist dies [...]

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  109. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

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  111. [...] can also test websites through analytics, Eye-tracking heat map, and customers’ actual online experiences (basically a recorded user interaction without them [...]

  112. (via Pingback)

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  113. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

  114. (via Pingback)

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  115. [...] Consultar post aqui [...]

  116. (via Pingback)

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  117. [...] specialist James Breeze conducted a study of how people view baby ads with 106 subjects (You Look Where They Look.). He used eye-tracking technology to measure the direction and duration of the subjects’ eye [...]

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    22/04/10

  119. [...] imagens acima oriundas de um estudo de acompanhamento do foco de visão (http://usableworld.com.au/2009/03/16/you-look-where-they-look/ ) reproduzem o seu resultado que sugere que somos institivamente atraídos por rostos. Porém, se [...]

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    23/04/10

  121. [...] to this eye tracking study, viewers look at people’s eyes and they look where people are looking. As a result, I’m fairly sure that images of people looking at the camera are more engaging [...]

  122. (via Pingback)

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  123. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

  124. (via Pingback)

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  125. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

  126. (via Pingback)

    28/06/10

  127. [...] Voor mensen die niet vertrouwd zijn met dit soort heatmaps: wat u ziet is het resultaat van eyetracking onderzoek waarbij de ogen van deelnemers worden gevolgd. De rode zones geven gebieden weer waar 80 tot 100% van de bezoekers naar keken. In dit geval gaat het om 106 personen. Het onderzoek werd uitgevoerd door het Australische UsableWorld. [...]

  128. (via Pingback)

    11/07/10

  129. [...] Eye-tracking heat map of a baby looking directly at us, from the UsableWorld study. [...]

  130. (via Pingback)

    20/08/10

  131. [...] 一个正在看我们的小孩儿的图片的眼动跟踪热图,来自于UsableWorld的研究。 [...]

  132. (via Pingback)

    07/09/10

  133. [...] The donate call-to-action is of course the first thing you see at the top of the page with plenty of space around it. Focus is further strengthened by the use of the gorilla photograph, who’s gaze points towards the text (ref: You Look Where They Look.) [...]

  134. (via Pingback)

    04/10/10

  135. [...] an eye-tracking study that demonstrates this. We’re instinctively drawn to faces, but if that face is looking somewhere [...]

  136. (via Pingback)

    13/10/10

  137. [...] very interesting fact is that visitors tend to focus on people’s faces and eyes on web pages, a great technique to [...]

  138. (via Pingback)

    13/12/10

  139. [...] from You look where they look by James Breeze and How A Pretty Face Can Push Visitors Away by Bryan Eisenberg, [...]

  140. (via Pingback)

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  141. [...] L’image parle d’elle-même : le parcours de lecture diffère en fonction de la position du personnage, et d’autant plus si celui-ci dirige son regard vers un point précis. Tout naturellement, l’internaute suivra ce mouvement, étonnant non ? (Source des images ici) [...]

  142. (via Pingback)

    08/01/11

  143. [...] your website, make sure that the face is looking where you want the user to look at as well.  An eye-tracking survey reveals that “people faces can be used to guide people around the [...]

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    21/02/11

  145. [...] 婴儿注视我们时的眼动追踪热区图,来自UsableWorld的研究 。 [...]

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  147. [...] Der Baby-Eyetracking-Test von Usableworld.com [...]

  148. (via Pingback)

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  150. [...] but very powerful – way to direct the attention to the like button is with humans faces. Various researches have shown that a the human eye follows the view of a shown face. The following image [...]

  151. (via Pingback)

    19/05/11

  152. [...] kijken naar gezichten James Breeze laat op zijn weblog Usableworld.com.au prachtig zien wat het resultaat was van een usability test die hij zelf [...]

  153. (via Pingback)

    23/07/11

  154. [...] gaze is almost a reflex. James Breeze demonstrated this really well in a blog post called “You look where they look.” His experiment was simple: about 100 people were shown a picture of an advertisement with a [...]

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    26/07/11

  156. [...] check out their site because they have some more great examples of baby images that direct [...]

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  158. [...] 有兴趣可以去Usable World的网站看看 [...]

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  160. [...] ( 有兴趣可以去Usable World的网站看看 ,他们有很多宝宝图片引导注意力的例子). [...]

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  162. [...] ( 有兴趣可以去Usable World的网站看看 ,他们有很多宝宝图片引导注意力的例子). [...]

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  164. [...] ( 有兴趣可以去Usable World的网站看看 ,他们有很多宝宝图片引导注意力的例子). [...]

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  166. [...] 有兴趣可以去Usable World的网站看看 [...]

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  168. [...] Breeze, an Australian usability specialist, found that even children as young as eleven months are more likely to look at a face on a page than at any other element, and will spend more time [...]

  169. (via Pingback)

    19/08/11

  170. [...] check out their site because they have some more great examples of baby images that direct [...]

  171. (via Pingback)

    13/09/11

  172. [...] Next, consider how to present the face. Direct eye contact can be powerful, but you can instead use the power of the face to orient a viewer’s attention toward the main message of your communication or its call to action. By turning the gaze of the featured face toward the area of your communication that you want the viewer to focus on, you will guide the viewer’s eye toward that area. This phenomenon is confirmed using eye-tracking software by James Breeze at usableworld.com.au. [...]

  173. (via Pingback)

    30/09/11

  174. [...] uncover a smarts are compliant to compensate courtesy to faces. James Breeze of UsableWorld put together a tiny square that used a Tobii T60 eye tracker to uncover where [...]

  175. (via Pingback)

    08/10/11

  176. [...] an image of a person looking towards the content, the visitor is more likely to look at it too? The theory is that you are more likely to look at something if someone else is looking at [...]

  177. (via Pingback)

    08/12/11

  178. [...] Here’s another post with great examples that prove the same. [...]

  179. (via Pingback)

    18/12/11

  180. [...] tracking heat maps on a marketing page showing what the impact of a face in marketing can have on James Breeze’s blog. I highly recommend reading it. Tags: marketing, networking, social media, Tips for [...]

  181. (via Pingback)

    08/01/12

  182. [...] From the site: Here’s where it gets cool: not only do people love to look at faces, but we often use them as clues as to where else to look. Following a person’s gaze is almost a reflex. James Breeze demonstrated this really well in a blog post called “You look where they look.” [...]

  183. (via Pingback)

    09/01/12

  184. [...] Here’s another post with great examples that prove the same. [...]

  185. (via Pingback)

    20/02/12

  186. [...] You Look Where They Look [...]

  187. (via Pingback)

    19/03/12

  188. [...] [6] Usable World. You look where they look. 16 maart 2009. Breeze, James. 19 maart 2012 http://usableworld.com.au/2009/03/16/you-look-where-they-look/ [...]

  189. (via Pingback)

    14/04/12

  190. [...] guess most of you have seen these pictures published by this eye tracking study, in which eye movements of study participants where tracked using some sophisticated [...]

  191. (via Pingback)

    24/04/12

  192. [...] imagens acima oriundas de um estudo de acompanhamento do foco de visão(http://usableworld.com.au/2009/03/16/you-look-where-they-look/ ) reproduzem o seu resultado que sugere que somos institivamente atraídos por rostos. Porém, se [...]

  193. (via Pingback)

    03/05/12

  194. [...] Badanie przeprowadzone metodą eye- trackingu dowiodło tej samej prawidłowości również w przypadku reklam. Wzięło w nim udział 106 osób, badanych również za pomocą urządzenia Tobii 160. Oglądana reklama przedstawiała niemowlę i była reklamą pieluch. W pierwszym badaniu dziecko siedziało przodem do obiektywu i jego twarz najbardziej przyciągała uwagę na najdłuższy okres czasu. Nagłówek reklamy i tekst na temat produktu prawie nie miały znaczenia. Na drugim zdjęciu dziecko patrzyło na tekst reklamy i to znacznie zmieniało schemat podążania wzrokiem odbiorcy. Co prawda twarz dziecka znowu najbardziej przykuwała uwagę jednak równie często badani patrzyli na nagłówek reklamy i tekst znajdujący się poniżej. Tam, gdzie dziecko patrzyło „wprost” na odbiorcę, jego twarz była obserwowana znacznie dłużej. Badane reklamy można zobaczyć tutaj. [...]

  195. (via Pingback)

    25/07/12

  196. [...] advice about the number of columns above, your next question may be how to arrange said columns. Studies have shown that readers’ eyes are attracted more strongly to striking imagery over text – even if the [...]

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